GET MO’ FROM YOUR ROW: How to row correctly, set up a program and get the best out of it!

Hi from France! We touched down for a weeks break at my paps’ place, he has been fighting a battle with multiple myeloma for the best part of 2 years so it is always great to come out here and spend quality time together with him and my step-mother Ariane – who is an absolute legend.

The weather is clear today but we landed in a thunderstorm so I had some time to sit and think about the best forms of HIIT training – as you do. One of the most effective tools in HIIT training is the none other than the concept 2 rower.

For those that don’t use the rower already, this is for you. And for those that already use the rower this is definitely for you too! It is always a positive step to go over the technical points and programming elements that make this type of training such a good option when you hit the gym (or if you have one at home).

Before we begin, you need to have a strong concept of what good rowing is so that you can reap the benefits of this type of exercise without causing yourself some damage in the process.

I was asked the other day about rowing by a friend of mine who wanted tips on how to do it without damaging his back. Instructing on this is a near impossible task without actually being there to coach the person whilst they’re doing it.

To try and remedy this problem I’ve created a little video to give you a clearer idea about what cues to make use of when you’re using this machine.

I feel this still only tells half the story. Rowing requires a very controlled tempo, I describe it as a 2-1 tempo where you take double the amount of time coming in towards the rower as you do pushing away from it.

During the ‘loading phase’ of the movement (when coming in towards the rower) your attention should be focused on keeping your spine straight as you flex your knees. This allows you, in the ‘driving phase’ (when pushing away from the rower) to push through your feet when you move backwards and engage the upper back and brace the core to create maximum torque.

Generate power through good technique rather than trying to just pull as hard as you can through the hands. It won’t help you go faster and it wont help to keep your back safe.

Now, in terms of setting up the rower for HIIT training you can easily set up the screen to set distance, time or calories.

Each of them are good parameters to judge intensity. Here are the tutorial videos to follow to set up a rower for any of those three methods of HIIT training.

Now you know how to set it up, let’s put together some programs.

Easy Intensity

200m/45sec/15kcal ON – 45sec OFF/REST

250m/60sec/25kcal ON – 60sec OFF/REST

Medium Intensity

250m/60sec/25kcal ON – 30sec OFF/REST

3000/75sec/30kcal ON – 45sec OFF/REST

High Intensity

400m/75sec/30kcal ON – 30sec OFF/REST

500m/90sec/40kcal ON – 45sec OFF/REST

Stick to your technique, follow the cues and stay consistent. You will see results.

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